core style series :: my style journey, part 3

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If you've been following along for Part 1 and Part 2 of this style series, you're in luck. We're at the fun part. The part where we get to imagine living out our dreams.

In the last post I talked about my why - the reasons that drive my style and ensure it's meaningful and serves me.

 

In this post I get to show you my ideal style.

 

My ideal style shows what I'm drawn to without any constraints or considerations. There's no concerns for what might fit my body, where I live, whether or not I require couture on any given day. 

 

Basically, imagine you live the life you want. Your dream life. Anything is possible. How would you style it?

 

That's the question I'm answering today.

 
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Above you can see a mood board that captures my ideal style.

It's a bit of a mix. You've got some very masculine looks next to some ultra-feminine looks. You got bits that look very structured and constructed and others that look natural and loose. Some bits are modern and some are clearly vintage.

And that's usually how it goes. 

We are complicated creatures, you know? Yes, you know. We have a range of tastes. For most of us, we don't just like one thing and only that thing. We're drawn to variety.

However, we're not drawn to everything. And that's what's key. Even amongst the varied looks, there are consistencies that pop out of ideal styles.

 

Uncovering thEse consistencies is the key to understanding and leveraging your ideal style.

 

Here are the consistencies I uncovered in my ideal style:

 

1. LESS IS MORE: Most pics I chose are simple. Either through a minimal amount of elements, the use of a small but consistent color palette, or providing lots of open space, I gravitate towards looks that have an element of simplicity to them.

2. STRUCTURED FEMININITY: There are lots of clearly feminine, almost classically feminine looks in the mood board. But there are also pics that are quite masculine in their styling. In addition the color palette tends to lean more masculine but the details lean more feminine.

3. FLAT WITH TEXTURE: Very minimal patterns show up; however, texture shows up consistently. Whether in the flowers on the dress or the wood grain, marbling, and other natural textures. Also in the loose and natural hair textures versus being perfectly and artificially smoothed and styled.

4. NATURAL WARMTH: My color preferences tend toward the neutral to cool side, but I gravitate toward warmer woods to provide some life and comfort to the looks. And I do need that warmth to like a look otherwise they feel too sterile and cold.

5. NEUTRAL: White, black, gray, and navy are pretty much the only colors I captured above. 

6. IMPERFECT YET STYLED: Each look I gravitate toward is one that looks like it was styled and given a good amount of consideration. However, they each have a natural or imperfect element to them that keeps them from looking too contrived. Pieces are slightly askew. Hair is slightly undone. Lines aren't perfectly straight. Things are on the floor. Handwriting is next to type. 

 

 

 

Now, you may be wondering how I got to that list.

 

This is usually the place where I hear clients worry that they won't be able to create their own list based off of their ideal look mood board. Trust me, you can.

 

Consider the elements of design: color, shape, line, texture, space, and form.

How do these show up across your mood board? What's consistent? What's not?

Now, what's the story that all this information is telling you?

 

You see, my list isn't just an understanding of the elements ... though you could certainly do that initially if you're feeling slightly overwhelmed or unsure. My list takes that information and tries to break it down to how all of those different aspects work together to make the look I love the most through answering the questions above.

And that's my ideal style.

I now have two of the three pieces I need to start to build out my core style.

The final piece comes next: lifestyle considerations and constraints.

Jessica Jo Fisher